Burt’s Bees, a pioneer in nature-based skin care, announced its latest research findings on the efficacy of natural origin skincare regimens. The data will be presented at the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) Annual Meeting from March 25-29, 2022, in Boston.

The latest research findings from Burt’s Bees highlight:

  • Clinical tolerability of a nature-based acne cleanser with 1% naturally derived salicylic acid compared to leading acne cleansers
  • Ability of a nature-based topical product containing rice milk, honey and aloe to help restore skin barrier dysfunction conditions
  • Daily photoprotection benefits of a nature-based, broad-spectrum mineral sunscreen containing bakuchiol
  • Effectiveness of a nature-based complex with Glycyrrhiza glabra, Curcuma longa and Terminalia chebula to brighten skin in vitro

“Our research continues to demonstrate the ability of natural origin ingredients and formulations to be well tolerated, effective skincare solutions that both dermatologists and patients can trust,” said Hemali Gunt, Ph.D., head of clinical and scientific affairs at Burt’s Bees. “The data presented at AAD 2022 underscore our commitment to addressing the varied skincare needs of today’s consumers through nature-based regimens that provide an important alternative to traditional synthetic-based products.”

Burt’s Bees posters at AAD 2022 will be available in-person from March 25-27 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. EDT and on the AAD ePoster archives and include:

  • Evaluation of Skin Mildness of a Nature-Based Acne Cleanser in Controlled Washing Test; McCauley S., Gunt H.

    • About the Research: To assess the effects of a nature-based acne cleanser on the skin barrier, a comparative controlled forearm washing study was conducted against two leading acne cleansers.

      • Results indicated that skin cleansing with the nature-based acne cleanser containing 1% naturally derived salicylic acid was gentle yet effective when compared with a leading acne product containing 0.5% salicylic acid.
      • The product was well tolerated in subjects with moderate/mild-grade facial acne, reinforcing potential use as a first-line regimen for individuals with mild or moderate acne and demonstrating that a nature-based acne cleanser can be effective and less irritating than a second leading acne product with a higher concentration of salicylic acid.

  • Topical Treatment With Nature-Based Product Restores Skin Barrier and Relieves Sensory Discomfort in Sensitive Skin – Ex Vivo and Clinical Evaluations; Levy S., Gunt H.

    • About the Research: Two studies were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a nature-based topical product containing rice milk, honey and aloe in supporting skin barrier function.

      • Results confirmed a 20% reduction of involucrin expression in tissues treated with test product versus untreated control.
      • A significant decrease in symptomatic responses was noted by subjects, indicating improved quality of life and reinforcing the product’s use in those with barrier dysfunction conditions.

  • Clinical and Biophysical Assessment of the Effects of Daily Use of a Nature-Based, Broad-Spectrum Mineral Sunscreen Containing Bakuchiol in Photoaged Skin; Draelos Z., Gunt H., Levy S.

    • About the Research: A clinical study was conducted to investigate the ability of a nature-based, broad-spectrum mineral sunscreen to improve clinical outcomes of photodamaged skin.

      • Results confirmed daily use of the nature-based, broad-spectrum mineral sunscreen containing bakuchiol visibly improved signs of photodamage and enhanced the skin’s biophysical properties.

        • Investigator clinical evaluations showed significant improvements in skin firmness, fine lines, smoothness, tone, pigmentation and texture.

      • Skin hydration and elasticity were significantly improved with no disruption to skin barrier function, and the product was well tolerated in a sensitive skin population.

    • An oral presentation of this data will be shared on Friday, March 25 at 1:55 p.m. EDT in Poster Presentation Center 1 in the exhibit hall.

  • Inhibitory Effects of a Nature-Based Skin Brightening Complex on Melanin Production Utilizing an In Vitro Skin Tissue Model; Gunt H., Levy S.

    • About the Research: An in vitro study was conducted to investigate the brightening effects of a nature-based complex containing key botanicals Glycyrrhiza glabra, Curcuma longa and Terminalia chebula.

      • Results confirmed a significant increase in surface reflectance in tissues treated with the positive control on Days 5, 9 and 14 versus untreated control.
      • A significant decrease in melanin content was seen in tissues treated with the positive control (Kojic acid), Terminalia chebula, Curcuma longa and nature-based complex with botanicals when compared to untreated control tissues.

“Patients of all skin types and tones are increasingly expressing concerns around skin pigmentary abnormalities like uneven skin tones and age spots, so our evidence supporting nature-based skin brightening treatments offers an important alternative to more traditional methods,” said Stanley Levy, M.D., a board-certified dermatologist in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and study investigator. “Our research showed a significant increase in surface reflectance in tissues treated with the nature-based ingredients as well as the test product, demonstrating the skin brightening potential of a nature-based complex, particularly for those with melanin-rich skin.”

Burt’s Bees provides resources for health care professionals through BurtsBeesDermatology.com, including recent clinical data in nature-based skin care. Meeting attendees can also visit the Burt’s Bees AAD booth (#1273) to experience the Proven Power of Nature through a live art exhibit, meet with the R&D team to discuss the brand’s latest research and sign up for exclusive access to clinical publications and research.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here